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Built-in screens in modern vehicles can add to distraction

Distracted driving takes many forms, and not all of them are as obviously dangerous as others. Most people already understand that looking down at their mobile phone or similar device while driving is dangerous.

What they may not realize is that the screens installed directly in their vehicle by the manufacturer can be just as dangerous and distracting as the screens that they bring into the vehicle. Adjusting or looking at a built-in screen could very easily lead to a distracted driving crash.

Anything that takes a driver’s focus off the road is a distraction

People seem to me that the screens installed in their vehicle, as well as devices for GPS navigation or audio systems are safe to use while the vehicle is in motion. However, distraction involves taking your hands off the wheel, taking your eyes off the road or letting your mind wander to another subject.

Inputting a destination for GPS navigation, scrolling through satellite radio channels and even adjusting climate control in your vehicle while driving could all contribute to a crash. Proprietary touchscreens in the vehicle can add another layer of risk through bad user interfaces or other issues that make it harder for people to use them quickly.

Avoiding distractions yourself will only reduce half of the risk factors for a distracted driving crash, as other drivers will always pose a risk to you. If you believe that the other driver involved in a collision that left you hurt or dealing with substantial property damage, that distraction could open a doorway to seeking compensation from that driver.